Books

BOOKS I READ IN OCTOBER AND NOVEMBER

‘I read books because I love them, not because I think I should Read Them’- Simon Van Booy

The following are the books I read in October and November;

The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz

 

Things have never been easy for Oscar. A ghetto nerd living with his Dominican family in New Jersey, he’s sweet but disastrously overweight. He dreams of becoming the next J.R.R. Tolkien but keeps falling hopelessly in love. Meanwhile his punk sister Lola wants to run away, and his enduring mother Beli can’t seem to let either of them go.

The Hotel on Mulberry Bay by Melissa Hill

Mulberry Hotel, perched on a clifftop above a sweeping bay, was once the heart and soul of pretty seaside town Mulberry Bay. Run by the Harte family for years, the place itself is almost as beloved as cheery landlady Anna. The hotel was also once home to thirty-something sisters Eleanor and Penny, and while youngest sister Penny still lives close by, it’s been some time since Elle has visited. But following a family tragedy, Elle is forced to return from her busy London life and reassess her past. When it becomes apparent that the hotel is in dire straits, Elle and Penny are unprepared for the reaction of their father, Ned, He steadfastly refuses to give up the family legacy, revealing that he’s given up something equally precious once before. Startled by their father’s surprising revelation, the sisters unite, with the local community behind them, in their efforts to save the hotel – and, in the process, heal the fractures in the Harte family.

The Key to Rebecca by Ken Follett

 

A brilliant and ruthless Nazi master agent is on the loose in Cairo. His mission is to send Rommel’s advancing army the secrets that will unlock the city’s doors. In all of Cairo, only two people can stop him. One is a down-on-his-luck English officer no one will listen to. The other is a vulnerable young Jewish girl.

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

 

In the 1970s Afghanistan; twelve-year-old Amir is desperate to win the local kite-fighting tournament and his loyal friend Hassan promises to help him. But neither of the boys can foresee what will happen to Hassan that afternoon, an event that is to shatter their lives.

The Color Purple by Alice Walker

 

Set in the deep American South between the wars, it is the tale of Celie, a young black girl born into poverty and segregation. Raped repeatedly by the man she calls ‘father’, she has two children taken away from her, is separated from her beloved sister Nettie and is trapped into an ugly marriage. But then she meets the glamorous Shug Avery, singer and magic-maker – a woman who has taken charge of her own destiny. Gradually, Celie discovers the power and joy of her own spirit, freeing her from her past and reuniting her with those she loves.

 

Can you keep a Secret? by Sophie Kinsella

Meet Emma Corrigan, a young woman with a huge heart, an irrepressible spirit, and a few little secrets: Secrets from her boyfriend: I’ve always thought Connor looks a bit like Ken. As in Barbie and Ken. Secrets from her mother: I lost my virginity in the spare bedroom with Danny Nussbaum while Mum and Dad were downstairs watching Ben-Hur. Secrets she wouldn’t share with anyone in the world: I have no idea what NATO stands for. Or even what it is. Until she spills them all to a handsome stranger on a plane. At least, she thought he was a stranger.…Until Emma comes face-to-face with Jack Harper, the company’s elusive CEO, a man who knows every single humiliating detail about her.

Remember Me? by Sophie Kinsella

It is about Lexi Smart, a woman who has insecurities about herself until she experiences amnesia after a car accident. When she wakes up in the hospital she finds that she is a completely different person: she thinks it’s 2004 and she’s a twenty-five-year-old with crooked teeth, a disastrous love life and a dead-end job.

 

Swing Time by Zadie Smith

 

Two brown girls dream of being dancers–but only one, Tracey, has talent. The other has ideas: about rhythm and time, about black bodies and black music, about what constitutes a tribe, or makes a person truly free. It’s a close but complicated childhood friendship that ends abruptly in their early twenties, never to be revisited, but never quite forgotten, either.

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

As teenagers in Lagos, Ifemelu and Obinze fall in love. Their Nigeria is under military dictatorship, and people are fleeing the country if they can. The self-assured Ifemelu departs for America. There she suffers defeats and triumphs, finds and loses relationships, all the while feeling the weight of something she never thought of back home: race. Obinze had hoped to join her, but post-9/11 America will not let him in, and he plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London.

Thirteen years later, Obinze is a wealthy man in a newly democratic Nigeria, while Ifemelu has achieved success as a blogger. But after so long apart and so many changes, will they find the courage to meet again, face to face?

 

What are you reading?

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